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Posts Tagged ‘Funny cartoon’

Pure Fun.

Caption by Pure Michigan contest winner Sue Bartlett

Who doesn’t remember going to the fair during the hottest month of summer vacation? Did that stop the anticipation of carnival rides, elephant ears and the lure of winning the big banana at the ring toss the on the midway?

This year the big kids even had a chance to win a pretty cool prize at the Upper Peninsula State Fair. A souped up Pure Michigan Roush 2012 Mustang.

Big Bananas. Pure Local Fun.

But the local fair is more than prizes and rides. It’s learning about livestock and witnessing the miracle of life. It’s learning about the environment. The UP State Fair even has a Green Forester Exhibit that teaches the significance of trees in our ecosystem. You can also interact with an exhibit on how important farming and agriculture is to Michigan.

The Fair. It’s about community. Where neighbors meet each other and cheer on their favorite pie in the baking contest. Or, marvel at the butter sculpting exhibit. Where family and friends can remember a summer day of chainsaw carving, lumberjack shows and tummy-aches from too much cotton candy and deep fried pickles.

Be sure to savor your summer. Look back fondly with time spent with your family and friends. Be a part of Michigan’s heritage.

As I’ve outgrown my childhood years, the lure and excitement still lives in my spirit – except for maybe the “guess your weight and age” game. Especially after a day of corn dogs and funnel cakes.

Pure Michigan Caption Contest

Time To Make The Donuts

Donuts. Not the kind that leave colorful sprinkles all over your desk. Not even the kind that Homer Simpson loves so much. But mulch donuts.

Too mulch love.

Over-mulching ranks right up there for the top reason newly planted trees die. That’s why mulch donuts are the way to go.  According to Arborist and forester Brian Colter, a protective layer of mulch around the base of your tree is a good thing but, he says, more mulch isn’t necessarily better.  Never “volcano” the mulch right up to the trunk were the chips press against it because after a period of time the tree will rot and die. Not only that, mice and insects may hide in there and feed on parts of the tree.

This is where the donuts come in. Form the mulch into the shape of a donut by keeping it away from the trunk and the rootball of the tree. Not only is mulching good for the soil and root growth, but it also helps keep lawn mowers and weed-whackers from damaging the bark of a tree. Open wounds are a bad thing. Truth be told, that’s the number one reason newbie trees perish.

Donuts. Maybe not the kind with colorful sprinkles on top, but trees like them too. And most probably better for them than for us.

Spring Mills Elementary Caption Contest Winners!

Congratulations to Jacob S. and to Zakary K. for coming up with the winning captions for this Earth Day cartoon! Such smart and funny thinking from these up and coming writers and cartoonists!

Table Of Bees

Middle School. The awkward years. I flashed back as I was carrying my box of my “Just Bea” Cartoon display stuff down the long locker lined hallway. What to expect. What will the kids think of my cartoon. Will I get the ‘ol stink eye?

Kids in the hall.

As I made it to my destination, I glimpsed that the Anchor Bay Middle School students had made a huge drawing of the “Table of  Bees” cartoon from the Caption Contest entry form for my display table at the Family Science Night. Then I looked up – hey wait. That’s a drawing of a different “Just Bea” cartoon. Then I spied another one. Then another.  That’s when it sank in. The hall walls were filled with student’s renderings of various “Just Bea” cartoons. Not only that, turns out Ms Wiles’ students were using the cartoons as a study aid for their science class! Some students even chose to do extra credit projects using “their” cartoon. Emily chose “Earth Movers” as her cartoon and created an edible earthworm landscape that included gummi worms and even chocolate chip “worm poop.” I hope she got lots of extra credit points for that one.

The kids had fun filling out the talk bubble for what they thought Buster might be saying as he’s studying the honeybees and why they could be disappearing. Olivia Z. was the winner of the “Cartoon Caption Contest” you see in this posting! To see the honorable mentions, photos of the wonderful drawings, projects and Emily’s fun worm farm, too – be sure to go to www.facebook.com/JustBeaCartoon www.facebook.com/JustBeaCartoon

It ended up that I had nothing to fear. The kids were great and my “teenage” angst soon disappeared when I got looks of surprise, seeing the kids proudly present their work and even hugs at the end of the night. I hope they had as much fun with it as I did.

Birthday Green

Green has always been my favorite color. Various shades, forest, gray green, lime. But come to think of it, I’ve never had a green or “green” birthday party. Not that I can remember.

I have, although, wrapped gifts in the Sunday comics because it was fun and reused gift bags and bows because it made sense, but until now never considered that to be green.

Birthday Green. Now we’re talking.

When I found out it was greeningdetroit.com‘s 2nd birthday it got me to thinking. What would make for a more sustainable birthday party?

Some posts I read encourage no gifts for the birthday honoree – but I don’t see that going over so well with a 6 year old. So here are some other ideas.

Possibly skip the paper invitations and send personal emails, set up a Facebook event, or use an online invitation site like Evite.com instead.

For kids, colored pencils are a fun party favor that can be used over and over and are much less likely than a plastic toy to end up in the bottom of the toy box and worse – the landfill.

Another way is to green up the party is to eliminate paper and disposables. Rather than using paper plates, plastic cups and plasticware, what works quite nicely are re-usable plates, flatware, and napkins. Did you know that during an average year, an American uses approximately around six paper napkins each day. If everyone in the U.S. used one less napkin a day, more than a billion pounds of napkins could be saved from landfills each year. Same goes for special occasions. Just sayin’.

Let’s give it a try, how about we start by clicking on greeningdetroit.com and give a them big paperless birthday wish. And while you’re there under the “big green umbrella” maybe you’ll find more ways to make your next birthday party a little bit greener.

Got Worms?

My significant other had never come across a tomato worm before. You know, the big fat green worm with horns? Now he had one in his very own garden and didn’t know what to make of it. So, while poking around on the internet on how to get rid of the vermin, I ran across a natural deterrent. Dill. Yes, dill weed.

Got Worms?

If you do, then need to know this. The worms love dill even more than the tomatoes themselves. It seems that if you plant dill near the tomatoes, the worms will gravitate towards the dill and away from your prized, red juicy fruit.

I found another way to get rid of the critters organically is by sprinkling cornmeal around the plants. The idea is that when the worms eat the cornmeal then drink water, they swell up and burst. I opt for the former “dill weed” pest defense, myself.

In the meantime, it seems like everyone has a good tomato worm story. My friend Stefanie shared one with me (see below) and I hope you will too!

Who’s Afraid of a Little Worm?

When Birgit told me she was creating a strip about tomato worms, the first thing I said to her was my mom chased me around our backyard with one when I was about 8. Maybe I should explain.

I grew up with vegetables. My parents always had a garden. In fact, when it wasn’t a cool to grow your own produce, my dad plowed up a quarter of the backyard of our house in the suburbs to plant vegetables that always included a wide variety of tomatoes. Picking the “crops” was an everyday occurrence for my whole family and I never minded it until my first up close and personal visit with a tomato worm.

In my opinion, tomato worms are some of the nastiest looking pests you’ll ever find in a garden. They are green and plump and they stick themselves to tomato leaves and feast. Since those little munchers are the same color as the plant you don’t see them until you’re right on them and that’s exactly what happened to me. Hello ripe tomato, I’ll put you in the basket. Hello, wait, what’s that?! Ahhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!! (It’s hard to know how many explanation points to use, I believe the entire neighborhood thought I was on fire.)

My mom was also in the garden. She came over, told me to stop yelling, broke off the leaf with the offending worm and (now here’s where the story becomes a bit cloudy) chased me around the backyard with the wormy leaf. That’s my version. I called my mom to get a little insight before I outed her to the world as someone who would chase her child with a worm and she told me a much different story. Apparently my mom hates tomato worms too, but as a mom, she saw it her duty to protect the crops and set an example for her children. Like she would be afraid of a worm? So she worked up enough courage to break off the tomato leaf and tried to show me it was no big deal. But when she raised the leaf toward me, I thought she was going to touch me with the worm and the screaming chaos ensued.

Thanks to Birgit, my parents will now be planting dill near their tomatoes.